Multiplication Rummy

Type of Activity:  Problem Solving

Source:  Card Games for Smart Kids, Margie Golick, Ph.D.

Published in:  Playing With A Full Deck, by Michelle Cummings 

Group Size:  2-4 players

Aim of the Game:  The object of Multiplication Rummy is to be the first to lay down all of your cards.

Setting Up the Cards:  One deck of cards with face cards removed.

Playing the Game:  There are only two traditional ‘sit down’ card games in this database. This one and Human Dominoes.  I decided to put them in because they are good Math Smart activities and are very good for after school programs or other programs that help kids with homework.

Players agree on what multiplication table they will be playing (such as the six-times multiplication table).  As a variation they may agree to play for four deals (complete run-throughs of the deck), start with the six times table and increasing it by one each deal.  Deal seven cards to each player.  Put the remaining deck in the middle and turn up the top card.

Process:  The first player may take the exposed card or the top card of the deck.  He must discard a card from his hand, placing it on top of the faceup card.  Play continues in this fashion.

Players, at their turn, may lay down a card or the top card of the deck.  He must discard a card from his hand, placing it on top of the faceup card.  Play continues in this fashion.

Players, at their turn, may lay down a card or combinations of two or three cards, using the numbers to form the digits of numbers that are multiples of the agreed-on number.  If, for example, the game is built around the eight-times table, a player may lay down a 6 and a 4, as 64, because 8 x 8 = 64.

Tens may be used in two ways:  a 10 can be laid out with another card placed across it to indicate that the 10 is being multiplied by that number.  Thus, if we were playing, “Eights” (which uses the eight-times multiplication table), a 10 could be played with a 4 across it to stand for 40 (5 x 8 = 40).

Tens can also be used to represent the number 10.  For example, in playing “nines,” a player might lay down a 10 and an 8 as 108, because 12 x 9 = 108.  Play continues until one player gets rid of all his cards and is the winner of that deal.

Scoring:  To calculate their points, players who lost that round count the cards remaining in their hands and multiply the number by the key number for that deal.  So, if they are playing “Eights,” then the number is 8.  The overall winner is the player with the lowest number of points at the end of four deals.

Suggestion:  For very young children who do not know their multiplication tables, have the tables available, or provide the player who needs it with a calculator.  The repetition provided by playing will help make these multiplication facts automatic.

Learning styles utilized from the 7 Kinds of Smart:  ~logic smart, people smart 

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